Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Leading The Pack!

Here's an Orrin Woodward classic I dug up from the archives. I love how years later principles never ever change! It's short but sweet and still appropriate!

God Bless!
Capt. Bill

Leading The Pack!

Leaders stay a little more progressive.

They do so by:

Being a little more innovative. A little more creative.

By taking that extra step.

Spending a little more effort.

Getting a little more accomplished.

Getting a few more results.

However, leaders can't run too far ahead of the pack without bringing others with them. They need support from others to be successful themselves. Leaders stay ahead but make sure others are with them.

It is a mistake to look too far ahead. Only one link in the chain of destiny can be handled at a time.
Winston Churchill

Monday, June 18, 2012

Leaders Are LIFE-Time Learners!

You have to love the concept of compensated communities! Every community has leadership, and to be one of those leaders you have to have something to offer those you intend to lead. Below is a great Orrin Woodward post on just that topic!
God Bless!
Capt. Bill

Every leader must be a learner. Why? Because no leader has all the answers. Therefore, a leader must constantly be learning to improve and grow. In fact, if a person refuses to learn, he has effectively limited his ability to lead. This is the reason hunger is so essential for leadership because only a hungry person will keep striving to learn more.

Are you a hungry leader? Are you humble enough to know that you don’t know everything? Are you willing to read, listen, and associate with other leaders in a community in order to improve yourself? The LIFE community is what makes LIFE’s leadership better than any other leadership company. LIFE’s leadership materials supply people with topnotch leadership teachings, but even more importantly, it’s the LIFE community that provides the environment in which to apply the leadership principles daily.

LIFE, by having a compensated community, has a competitive advantage on the rest of the leadership companies. Here are some sites by other founders of LIFE that every member should visit. Click on the name for direct access!

Claude Hamilton
Dan Hawkins
Tim Marks

Orrin Woodward

Monday, April 30, 2012

Life With Orrin Woodward!

You have to love this concept! Who doesn't want to improve in every area of their life? Join us in the 90 day Mental Fitness Challenge!
God Bless!
Capt. Bill

It is here – The Mental Fitness Challenge! The official release of the best systematically designed personal development program ever. I teamed up with NY Times best-selling author Chris Brady to conceptualize and develop a step-by-step process to grow personally from the inside out starting with private achievements, moving onto public achievements, then to leadership achievements, and eventually culminating in a legacy achievement. Anyone reading this who has the mind, heart, and desire to change can now achieve his or her destiny.

The Mental Fitness Challenge is based around my book RESOLVED: 13 Resolutions for LIFE. Each of the resolutions is focused on for one week, leading to a 13-week program designed to inculcate the 13 resolutions mindset into your life. I have never been happier with a personal development product, and I am excited to play a part in helping people fulfill their purposes. What is the life you have always wanted? Isn’t it time to pursue it today?

Orrin Woodward

Thursday, April 05, 2012


One of the many things I admire about Orrin Woodward is his ability to sniff out information us average humanoids just don't have the time or will to find. Take advantage of this great information Orrin has taken the time to share with us!

God Bless!
Capt. Bill

Strength of will and tact are not necessarily, perhaps not generally, conjoined, and often the first seems somewhat to impair the second. The strong passion, the intense conviction, the commanding and imperious nature overriding obstacles and defying opposition, that often goes with a will of abnormal strength, does not naturally harmonize with the reticence of expression, the delicacy of touch and management that characterize a man who possesses in a high degree the gift of tact. There are circumstances and times when each of these two things is more important than the other, and the success of each man will mainly depend upon the suitability of his peculiar gift to the work he has to do.

‘The daring pilot in extremity’ is often by no means the best navigator in a quiet sea; and men who have shown themselves supremely great in moments of crisis and appalling danger, who have built up mighty nations, subdued savage tribes, guided the bark of the State with skill and courage amid the storms of revolution or civil war, and written their names in indelible letters on the page of history, have sometimes proved far less successful than men of inferior powers in the art of managing assemblies, satisfying rival interests or assuaging by judicious compromise old hatreds and prejudices. We have had at least one conspicuous example of the difference of these two types in our own day in the life of the great founder of German Unity.

Sometimes, however, men of great strength of will and purpose possess also in a high degree the gift of tact; and when this is combined with soundness of judgment it usually leads to a success in life out of all proportion to their purely intellectual qualities. In nearly all administrative posts, in all the many fields of labour where the task of man is to govern, manage, or influence others, to adjust or harmonize antagonisms of race or interests or prejudices, to carry through difficult business without friction and by skillful co-operation, this combination of gifts is supremely valuable. It is much more valuable than brilliancy, eloquence, or originality. I remember the comment of a good judge of men on the administration of a great governor who was pre-eminently remarkable for this combination. ‘ He always seemed to gain his point, yet he never appeared to be in antagonism with anyone.’ The steady pressure of a firm and consistent will was scarcely felt when it was accompanied by the ready recognition of everything that was good in the argument of another, and by a charm of manner and of temper which seldom failed to disarm opposition and win personal affection.

The combination of qualities which, though not absolutely incompatible, are very usually disconnected, is the secret of many successful lives. Thus, to take one of the most homely, but one of the most useful and most pleasing of all qualities—good-nature—it will too often be found that when it is the marked and leading feature of a character it is accompanied by some want of firmness, energy, and judgment. Sometimes, however, this is not the case, and there are then few greater elements of success. It is curious to observe the subtle, magnetic sympathy by which men feel whether their neighbor is a harsh or a kind judge of others, and how generally those who judge harshly are themselves harshly judged, while those who judge others rather by their merits than by their defects, and perhaps a little above their merits, win popularity.

No one, indeed, can fail to notice the effect of good nature in conciliating opposition, securing attachment, smoothing the various paths of life, and, it must be added, concealing grave faults. Laxities of conduct that might veil blast the reputation of a man or a woman are constantly forgotten, or at least forgiven, in those who lead a life of tactful good-nature, and in the eyes of the world this quality is more valued than others of far higher and more solid worth.

Though in its higher degrees it is essentially a natural gift, and is sometimes conspicuous in perfectly uneducated men, it may be largely cultivated and improved; and in this respect the education of good society is especially valuable. Such an education, whatever else it may do, at least removes many jarring notes from the rhythm of life. It tends to correct faults of manner, demeanor, or pronunciation which tell against men to a degree altogether disproportioned to their real importance, and on which, it is hardly too much to say, the casual judgments of the world are mainly formed; and it also fosters moral qualities which are essentially of the nature of tact.

We can hardly have a better picture of a really tactful man than in some sentences taken from the admirable pages in which Cardinal Newman has painted the character of the perfect gentleman.

‘ It is almost a definition of a gentleman to say he is one who never inflicts pain. … He carefully avoids whatever may cause a jar or a jolt in the minds of those with whom he is cast—all clashing of opinion or collision of feeling, all restraint or suspicion or gloom or resentment; his great concern being to make everyone at ease and at home. He has his eyes on all his company; he is tender towards the bashful, gentle towards the distant, and merciful towards the absurd; he can recollect to whom he is speaking; he guards against unreasonable allusions or topics that may irritate; he is seldom prominent in conversation, and never wearisome. He makes light of favors while he does them, and seems to be receiving when he is conferring. He never speaks of himself except when compelled, never defends himself by a mere retort; he has no ears for slander or gossip, is scrupulous in imputing motives to those who interfere with him, and interprets everything for the best. He is never mean or little in his disputes, never takes an unfair advantage, never mistakes personalities or sharp sayings for arguments, or insinuates evil which he dare not say out. . . . He has too much good sense to be affronted at insult; he is too busy to remember injuries, and too indolent to bear malice. … If he engages in controversy of any kind his disciplined intellect preserves him from the blundering discourtesy of better though less educated minds, who, like blunt weapons, tear and hack instead of cutting clean. … He may be right or wrong in his opinion, but he is too clear-headed to be unjust; he is as simple as he is forcible, and as brief as he is decisive. Nowhere shall we find greater candor, consideration, indulgence. He throws himself into the minds of his opponents, he accounts for their mistakes. He knows the weakness of human nature as well as its strength, its province, and its limits.’